Small Farms, Big Steps

Thailand is a country located at the center of the Indochina peninsula in Southeast Asia and is the third largest producer of crude palm oil (CPO) in the world. Over 70 percent of oil palm in Thailand is produced by Independent smallholders.
It is the first country in the world to have independent smallholders (those that own less than 50 hectares of land) certified by the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO). In Thailand there is now a community of 412 smallholders whose more than 2,700 hectares of combined planted land is certified.
 Palm oil and ingredients derived from palm oil are commonly used in personal care products such as soaps, lotions, shampoos and creams. The oil, which comes from the fruit of the oil palm tree, is also used in the production of food and biofuel. The demand for palm oil is increasing, causing damage to rainforests and threatening the environments of several endangered species.
Sixty year-old Warin Jaikliang has been farming oil palm for 32 years. He is an independent oil palm farmer at the Palm Oil Community Learning Center Plantation in Krabi, a province on southern Thailand’s Andaman coast.
Warin and other smallholders in Thailand recently received training from GIZ to help them farm oil palm safely and more sustainably. “By taking care of the environment, we can maintain a sustainable balance to ensure our activities that relate to running a palm plantation,” he says.
Warin calls on his fellow oil palm growers to become certified by RSPO as he is, saying, “You will gain a great deal of new knowledge to sustain our farms.” More RSPO-certified farms means more smallholders can seek access to international demand from end-users that only purchase certified sustainable palm oil (CSPO).
Johnson & Johnson is the first company to buy independent smallholder GreenPalm certificates from farmers, like Warin. Partnering with smallholders demonstrates our commitment to sustainable palm oil growers.
As suppliers of CSPO, the smallholders have more hope that the future of their palm plantations, and their livelihood as palm growers, will be sustainable. In turn, more available CSPO contributes to Johnson & Johnson achieving our goal to source palm oil and our ingredients that come from palm oil, from certified sustainable sources.
Thailand is a country located at the center of the Indochina peninsula in Southeast Asia and is the third largest producer of crude palm oil (CPO) in the world. Over 70 percent of oil palm in Thailand is produced by Independent smallholders.
It is the first country in the world to have independent smallholders (those that own less than 50 hectares of land) certified by the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO). In Thailand there is now a community of 412 smallholders whose more than 2,700 hectares of combined planted land is certified.
 Palm oil and ingredients derived from palm oil are commonly used in personal care products such as soaps, lotions, shampoos and creams. The oil, which comes from the fruit of the oil palm tree, is also used in the production of food and biofuel. The demand for palm oil is increasing, causing damage to rainforests and threatening the environments of several endangered species.
Sixty year-old Warin Jaikliang has been farming oil palm for 32 years. He is an independent oil palm farmer at the Palm Oil Community Learning Center Plantation in Krabi, a province on southern Thailand’s Andaman coast.
Warin and other smallholders in Thailand recently received training from GIZ to help them farm oil palm safely and more sustainably. “By taking care of the environment, we can maintain a sustainable balance to ensure our activities that relate to running a palm plantation,” he says.
Warin calls on his fellow oil palm growers to become certified by RSPO as he is, saying, “You will gain a great deal of new knowledge to sustain our farms.” More RSPO-certified farms means more smallholders can seek access to international demand from end-users that only purchase certified sustainable palm oil (CSPO).
Johnson & Johnson is the first company to buy independent smallholder GreenPalm certificates from farmers, like Warin. Partnering with smallholders demonstrates our commitment to sustainable palm oil growers.
As suppliers of CSPO, the smallholders have more hope that the future of their palm plantations, and their livelihood as palm growers, will be sustainable. In turn, more available CSPO contributes to Johnson & Johnson achieving our goal to source palm oil and our ingredients that come from palm oil, from certified sustainable sources.

In late 2012, Johnson & Johnson became the first global corporation to purchase GreenPalm certificates for sustainable palm oil from a group of independent smallholders (those that own less than 50 hectares of land) in Thailand.

Palm oil is commonly used in personal care products such as soaps, lotions, shampoos and creams. Although, overall, we are very small users of palm oil (around less than 0.2 percent of the estimated 50 million tons produced a year) we take our responsibility to protect the environment, and our natural resources, very seriously.

The 412 smallholders were certified by the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) earlier in 2012. RSPO certified palm oil provides farmers with additional income, helps them farm better and smarter, reduces pesticide and fertilizer use and increases yields. This means better quality fruit and fewer rejections of fruit from local mills; more reward for less effort, reducing the risk of deforestation and degradation of ecosystems. Johnson & Johnson would like to see the continued growth of certified sustainable palm oil (CSPO) and hopes other smallholders follow the example set by the group in Thailand. An increase in supply of CSPO will help the Company, and the industry, move towards a goal of sourcing palm oil and ingredients that come from palm oil sustainably.”

FIND OUT MORE:

GreenPalm
Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO)

From the 2012 Johnson & Johnson Annual Report